Landscape Logo Landscape Logo

Do you feel distressed about securing a new legal job?

The summer evenings are busy for some yes, don’t look back and wish you had made a more concerted effort to find your new job and ultimately new life. Time is of the essence, and you / we need to make sure we strike early, with impact, and make well informed decisions for your future.

Landing a new legal job is at the top of the agenda for a lot of lawyers who are looking to further their career. The market is really beginning to hot up, you'll therefore be pleased to know you haven't missed the boat this year! Do not give up if it hasn't happened yet, your new job could be around the corner. Here are some considerations when embarking on your job search.

 

The Summer is here

For many people, making applications on those long evenings of sun would be a task too hard to bare. Make the most of the overall lack of eagerness to make applications and make a concerted effort to put yourself out there with a good recruiter. Firstly, you need to figure out where you sit in the market, what is your value? What can you add to a firm? Why? Realistically, the process of securing a new legal job will take you beyond the beginning of Autumn. Speaking to a good recruiter can streamline that process and take away a lot of the stress of long and laborious applications.

 

Do you know what you're looking for?

Not only will a potential employer law firm and your legal recruiter ask you this several times throughout the job-seeking process, but most importantly, the answer to this question becomes your driving force and your motivation for applying. Make sure you have a fresh perspective on your firm. Don’t just have a cursory glance at the firms practice areas. Perhaps look into their business response to Brexit, look at the new areas of practice the firm is moving into and how the firm’s culture is changing.

 

Don’t make the mistake of not being clear

If you start losing sight of your vision and motivations, the task of securing a job could soon turn out to be more complex and stressful than you had initially thought. Reality will always bite once you go to an interview, receive an offer and it's time to hand in your notice. Landing the job for you doesn’t happen overnight, make the little time you have count and make sure your intent to apply is well considered. It is as much your job to tell the recruiter your motivations as it is their job to tell you why their opportunities are right for you – it’s a two way street.

 

How to be more clear

Be clear on what you're looking for: is it a total change in direction? a different working environment? more money or a better work / life balance? This is important for focussing on the agenda at the beginning of the process. Making sure you're covering all the suitable roles and ensures the you and your legal recruiter start off on the right foot. With no focus things can get confusing and misleading - you might end up attending interviews that aren’t quite right for you if you’re being looked after by a recruiter who isn’t experienced enough to read between the lines.

Luckily, that wouldn’t be the case with us here at JMC, we always make sure we understand your motivations before working with you so that we are likely to get it right for you!

 

A good place to start, because you must start somewhere...

You need to update your CV, making sure it’s correct, concise and contains the right information for the role you're applying for. Omit irrelevant information and make it as factual as possible. Do a grammar and spell check and proofread it at least twice. Don’t be caught out at the first hurdle. List the most notable cases you have been working on (a common mistake) often people in the legal profession fall short of the mark by only listing their general responsibilities.

Fundamentally, confide in your recruiter – if you are open and honest with them, assuming they’re the right one to work with, they will return that level of mutual respect and ultimately place you in your dream job!

Max Gulliford