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Research to recruitment, a student’s tale…

Recruitment is often considered one of the ‘go to’ industries for students who don’t have a specific career path in mind. There’s a misconception that if you can talk to people, and you have a bubbly personality recruitment is the job for you – but the fact of the matter is, success in the recruitment industry is much more complex than that.

Whatever discipline you have chosen to study, be this law, politics or business, graduation represents a step into the big wide world of business, something students cannot put on hold forever…

From personal experience, the transition is hard and admittedly, I wasn’t as prepared as I should have been thus explaining is my motivation for writing this piece. Going straight from the comfort of education into the one of the most testing environments of recruitment really wasn’t easy. As a result, I thought I might share some of the key things I have learned during this time, all of equal value to the other that may help someone moving into recruitment for the first time:

 

  1. Routine: The transition from university life, to the world of work is dramatic, but overall, not that bad! A lot is made from not only the work-style transition, but also the lifestyle. However, the truth of the matter is nailing down a good routine is KEY during such a transition. It may sound obvious, however if you can nail down a routine of even the most obvious things i.e. good night’s sleep, diet, commute, working life becomes easier.  This not only gets you in the right frame of mind for work but reduces stress during the first initial weeks. Sometimes, it’s the most obvious things that have the biggest impacts.

 

  1. Commitment: The fact of the matter is that work life is vastly different to university life. Moreover, there is never any true certainty that you will enjoy the first job yourself invest in. However, if you do not put 110% effort into your first stages of your career, I can guarantee regret is something you can be certain of. If less than full effort is put into your career, you will reap less rewards, find the work harder, become uncomfortably overwhelmed and perhaps most importantly, enjoy working life less. it’s a negative spiral that you want to do your best to avoid.

 

 

  1. Attitude: The first couple of weeks in any new role is hard, particularly in recruitment. You need grit, determination and resilience. Displaying the attitude to succeed not only shows your peers you have the desire to be successful, but those who demonstrate a positive working attitude create a positive work ethic, and a positive work ethic can only help you in the early stages of your career. During the first weeks of your new job, prioritising work over your social life isn’t a bad thing. In the long-term, I would always promote a healthy work-life balance, but in the first few weeks, I feel there are so many benefits from delving into the deep end and really putting yourself out there.

 

  1. Homework: As a university student, you should be used to homework. However, working from home in the first couple weeks really will hold you in good stead. Career homework can take various forms, from checking emails, to reading relevant literature, learning about the market that you’re working in. This is particularly relevant if you are in the legal industry – those in the legal industry will know if a recruiter knows their stuff or not, so do your best to make sure you know as much as possible

 

  1. Don’t be afraid to ask questions: It may sound cliché, but asking questions is the best way to learn. Its so important to surround yourself with positive individuals who are happy to address queries or questions. I entered an industry and had no prior knowledge in anything legal, however as a result of proactively asking questions, learning from those around me, I feel so much more confident in my role here at JMC. If you feel uncomfortable asking questions, then there is an issue – perhaps not with yourself, but with your working environment. 

Joe Bryant